Mac Pro Tips

Set up your new Mac

Use these basic setup steps to get your new Mac up and running.

 

Check for an Internet connection

It’s best to set up your Mac somewhere that has a Wi-Fi network or other connection to the Internet. Your Mac will use that connection to complete certain setup steps. If the network requires a password, have the password ready.

Plug in only the essential devices

If you’re using an external keyboard and trackpad or mouse, turn them on or plug them into your Mac. If you’re using an external display, plug it in and turn it on as well, but don’t connect any other peripherals yet. And of course plug in your Mac.

If you’ve never used a trackpad before, here’s a tip: To click, press down or tap on the trackpad surface.

Turn on your Mac

Some Mac notebooks automatically start up when you connect the computer to power or open its lid. On other Mac computers, press the power button to start up.

Use the setup assistant

A series of windows will ask you for setup details, such as your Apple ID. If you’ve used iTunes or have an iPhone or iPad, you already have an Apple ID. Use the same Apple ID on your Mac.

We recommend that you let the setup assistant turn on FileVaultiCloud Keychain, and Find My Mac. You can also let it transfer information from another computer or Time Machine backup, or you can do that later using Migration Assistant.

You’ll be asked to create the name and password of your computer account. You’ll need this information to log in to your Mac, change certain settings, and install software.

Check for software updates

When the setup assistant finishes setting up your Mac, you’ll see your Mac desktop, the Finder menu bar, and the Dock.

Click App Store in the Dock, then find and install any software updates. After your software is up to date, you can connect any printers or other peripherals and begin using your Mac.

Using 4K displays, 5K displays, and Ultra HD TVs with your Mac

Learn about Mac support for 4K displays, 5K displays, and Ultra HD TVs. Also learn about the system requirements and how to set up and adjust the display or TV.

Supported displays and configurations

You can use 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs with these Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, Late 2013) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (27-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • Mac mini (Late 2014)
  • MacBook Air (Early 2015)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later

HDMI

You can use 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs at the following resolutions and refresh rates via the built-in HDMI port of your Mac:

  • 3840×2160 at 30 Hz refresh rate
  • 4096×2160 at 24 Hz refresh rate (mirroring is not supported at this resolution)

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later, as well as late-2016 MacBook Pro models, support these resolutions and refresh rates over HDMI 1.4b using the USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter:

  • 3840×2160 at 30 Hz refresh rate
  • 4096×2160 at 24 Hz refresh rate (mirroring is not supported at this resolution)

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2016) and late-2016 MacBook Pro models support 60Hz refresh rates over HDMI when used with a supported HDMI 2.0 display, an HDMI Premium Certified cable, and a supported USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter.

Single-Stream (SST) displays

Most single-stream 4K displays are supported at 30Hz operation.

With OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later, most single-stream 4K (3840×2160) displays are supported at 60Hz operation on the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015) and later
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (27-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • MacBook Air (Early 2015)

With OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later, most single-stream 4K (4096×2160) displays are supported at 60Hz operation on the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later

With macOS Sierra, MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later supports 4K (3840×2160) displays at 60Hz operation over DisplayPort.

Multi-Stream Transport (MST) Displays

These Mac computers support multi-stream transport (MST) displays at 60 Hz:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later

If you use a 60Hz MST display with the MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015) with AMD Radeon R9 M370X graphics card or iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014), only one additional Thunderbolt display can be supported. Learn more about Thunderbolt ports and displays.

You need to manually configure 4K displays to use MST. Follow the steps below to use the display’s built-in controls to enable this feature.

  • Sharp PN-K321: Choose Menu > Setup > DisplayPort STREAM > MST > SET
  • ASUS PQ321Q: Choose OSD menu > Setup > DisplayPort Stream
  • Dell UP2414Q and UP3214Q: Choose Menu > Display Setting > DisplayPort 1.2 > Enable
  • Panasonic TC-L65WT600: Choose Menu > Display Port Settings > Stream Setting > Auto

If your specific DisplayPort display is not listed above, check with the display’s manufacturer for compatibility information.

Your Mac will automatically detect an MST-enabled display. However, your display might require a firmware update to support 60Hz operation. Contact your display’s manufacturer for details.

Dual-Cable Displays

Some displays with resolutions higher than 4K require two DisplayPort cables to connect the display at full resolution:

  • The Dell UP2715K 27-inch 5K display is supported by iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later and Mac Pro (Late 2013) running OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later.
  • The HP Z27q 5K display is supported by iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later and Mac Pro (Late 2013) running macOS Sierra.

LG UltraFine Displays

The LG UltraFine 4K Display is supported on these Mac computers with DisplayPort Alt-Mode over USB-C:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later

The LG UltraFine 5K Display is supported on these Mac computers with Thunderbolt 3:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)

Adjusting your display

Use System Preferences > Displays to adjust or scale the resolution on your display. This can make text and objects appear larger or give you more space on your screen.

Hover your mouse over one of the resolution options to see more detail on that option. To get a Detect Displays button to appear, press the Option key. To see all the available resolutions, hold down the Option key while clicking the Scaled button.

If you change display resolutions when mirroring to a 4K display or Ultra HD TV, some distortion can occur. Turn mirroring off and back on to correct this.

To get the best graphics performance from your 4K display, connect the display or its adapter directly to your Mac, instead of connecting through another peripheral or device.

Use multiple displays with your Mac Pro (Late 2013)

Learn how to connect multiple displays (such as monitors, TVs, and projectors) to your Mac Pro (Late 2013) using Thunderbolt, Mini DisplayPort, and HDMI connections.

Display configurations you can use with your Mac Pro (Late 2013)

You can connect up to six of the following properly-configured displays to your Mac Pro (Late 2013).

  • Six Apple Thunderbolt Displays (27-inch), Apple LED Cinema Displays (27-inch), or third-party Mini DisplayPort displays.
  • Three 4K displays: two connected via Mini DisplayPort and one connected via HDMI.
  • One 4K Ultra HD TV or 4K display using HDMI and four Apple Thunderbolt Displays (27-inch), Apple LED Cinema Displays (27-inch), or third-party Mini DisplayPort displays.
  • Two HDMI (HD or 4K) devices: one connected via HDMI and one connected via Mini DisplayPort with an HDMI adapter.
  • Six DVI displays. This configuration requires an active DVI adapter.

See Using 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs with Mac computers for a list of 4k displays that work with your Mac Pro.

When connecting your displays, make sure you’re using a supported configuration by connecting them to the HDMI and Thunderbolt ports on your Mac Pro. Attach displays to different Thunderbolt busses when possible (see the figure below). Don’t attach more than two displays to any bus. This means that if you use the HDMI port, be sure to then only use one of the bottom two Thunderbolt ports (Bus 0).

 

When you start up your Mac Pro, one connected display initially illuminates. Any additional connected displays display an image after your Mac is finished starting up. If one or more displays don’t display an image after startup is complete, make sure your displays and any display adapters are connected properly.

If you’re using Windows on your Mac with Boot Camp, it has different specifications for connecting multiple displays.

Use more than one 4K Ultra HD TV

You can connect a 4K Ultra HD TV to the HDMI port, and a 4K Ultra HD TV to a Thunderbolt port. Use an HDMI adapter that conforms to the High Speed HDMI cable standard. Check with the manufacturer of the cable to determine if it supports this standard. Don’t use Thunderbolt Bus 0 to connect this additional device if you’ve already connected a 4K Ultra HD TV to the HDMI port.

Use display rotation and scaling with a 4K Ultra HD TV or 4K display

Scaling and display rotation are supported for 4K Ultra HD TVs or 4K displays connected to your Mac Pro using the HDMI port. Some 4k displays might not work with display rotation when the display is set to multi-stream (MST) mode. If this happens, use the display in single-stream (SST) mode instead.

Connect a DVI display

Your Mac Pro (Late 2013) supports DVI displays using Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapters. Use a single-link DVI adapter such as the Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapter for DVI displays with a resolution up to 1920×1200. Use a Dual-Link DVI adapter such as the Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter for resolutions up to 2560×1600.

Your Mac Pro (Late 2013) supports a total of two single-link DVI displays. If you connect a third DVI display using a passive adapter or a display using HDMI, it causes one of the three displays to become inactive.

Connect more than two DVI or HDMI displays

Mac Pro supports a total of two DVI or HDMI displays when connected via the built-in HDMI port or using the Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapter. To connect additional DVI displays, use an active DVI adapter like the Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter. You can connect up to six active adapter DVI displays. This requires a powered USB hub since Mac Pro offers four USB ports and you need six USB ports to connect the Dual-Link DVI adapters.

Learn more

Get help with video issues on external displays connected to your Mac

Try these steps if the image on an external display connected to your Mac is blank or doesn’t look the way you expect.

Before you begin

You can resolve many display issues by updating the software on your Apple devices, cables, and adapters. If you can see an image on your screen, check for software updates using the Mac App Store:

  1. Connect your external display and any Apple video cables or adapters that you use with it.
  2. From the Apple menu, choose App Store.
  3. Click the Updates button in the App Store window.
  4. Install any macOS or firmware updates that are listed.

If you’re using a display, hub, extender, or adapter not made by Apple, check with the manufacturer for any updates that might be available.

If you’re trying to connect a 4K display or Ultra HD TV with your Mac, make sure your computer meets the requirements for using these external displays.

If your software and firmware are up to date, or if you can’t see the image on your screen, try the steps below for your specific issue.